Assignment #4

Saturation Studies

Problem: Create simple compositions demonstrating an accurate understanding of saturation.

Limits: Compositions will fit within a 6×6″ area and will be realized with cut paper (saturation studies) and other chosen materials (free-studies).

Materials: Creative Process Book, pencils, Bristol Board 9×6″, gouache paints, brushes, palette, rags, water container, scissors, exacto knife, ruler/t-square, glue, misc. chosen materials.

Concepts: Hue, Saturation, Prismatic Color, Muted Color, Chromatic Gray, Achromatic Gray, Luminosity, Primary Colors, Secondary Colors, Complementary Colors, Warm, Cool.

Technical Skills: painting techniques, draughmanship with ruler/t-square, exacto knife and collage.

Procedure:

  1. Research / Inspiration
    • Color Triads (FreeStudy)
      • Using your ruler, lightly draw two intersecting triangles on a piece of 9″x12″ bristol.
      • With your color wheel as a guide, practice mixing and applying colors on a piece of scrap paper, first. Make sure you have achieved the proper hue before applying the paint to paper.
      • Then fill in the tips of each triangle with the primary and secondary triads. Do NOT use pre-mixed paint hues. You must mix secondary triads from the primary triad: Red, Yellow and Blue.
      • Once you have successfully created the two triad relationships (primary and secondary), further develop your composition and create a FreeStudy!
        • Think about what each color might represent: mood, emotion, object.
        • Experiment with mixing all three primary colors together, what color is produced?
        • What happens when you mix two complementary colors together?
      • You may choose to cut out the color swatches and incorporate them with other materials, but make sure your final composition is laid out with a clear connection to the original triads and their placement on the color wheel.
      • References:

        Primary, Secondary, Tertiary

        Primary, Secondary, Tertiary

  2. Experimentation / Iteration
    Create the following Saturation studies: Chromatic Gray, Muted Color, Prismatic Color

    1. Chromatic Gray Studies – Exercise #1:
      1. Make a 6×6″ gouache, painted-paper collage using at least six shapes. All colors should be chromatic gray with a BROAD value range (light and dark) from a broad range of hues (colors). The white paper is not considered a color – the entire surface should be covered with paint.
      2. Use scrap pieces of bristol to create your painted paper shapes. Cut these out with scissors or exacto knife.
      3. Starting with a very small amount of a Prismatic Color (paint straight from the tube) add either the complementary color, white, or pre-mixed chromatic darks to achieve your range of chromatic grays. Adding white will create lighter value grays, adding pre-mixed chromatic darks or complementary colors will create darker value grays.
      4. The grays should have a discernible hue, but should lie closer to the center of the saturation spectrum (achromatic gray) than the outside (prismatic color).
      5. Arrange your shapes until you achieve a unified composition and then carefully glue down your pieces.
    2. Chromatic Gray Studies – Exercise #2:
      1. Make a 6×6″ gouache, painted-paper collage using at least six shapes. All colors should be chromatic gray with a NARROW value range from a broad range of hues (colors). The white paper is not considered a color – the entire surface should be covered with paint.
      2. Use scrap pieces of bristol to create your painted paper shapes. Cut these out with scissors or exacto knife.
      3. Starting with a very small amount of a Prismatic Color (paint straight from the tube) add either the complementary color, white, or pre-mixed chromatic darks to achieve your range of chromatic grays. Adding white will create lighter value grays, adding pre-mixed chromatic darks or complementary colors will create darker value grays.
      4. The grays should have a discernible hue, but should lie closer to the center of the saturation spectrum (achromatic gray) than the outside (prismatic color).
      5. Arrange your shapes until you achieve a unified composition and then carefully glue down your pieces.
    3. Muted Color Studies – Exercise #1:
      1. Make a 6×6″ gouache, painted-paper collage using at least six shapes. All colors should be MUTED with a BROAD value range (light and dark) from a BROAD range of hues (colors). The white paper is not considered a color – the entire surface should be covered with paint.Use scrap pieces of bristol to create your painted paper shapes. Cut these out with scissors or exacto knife.
      2. Starting with a Prismatic Color (paint straight from the tube) add either the complementary color, white, or pre-mixed chromatic darks to achieve your range of muted colors. Adding white will create a lighter value, adding a pre-mixed chromatic dark or complementary color will create darker value.
      3. Arrange your shapes until you achieve a unified composition and then carefully glue down your pieces.
      4. Muted Color Studies – Exercise #2:
      5. Make second 6×6″ gouache, painted-paper collage using at least six shapes. All colors should be MUTED with a NARROW value range (high, middle, or low key) from a broad range of hues (colors). The white paper is not considered a color – the entire surface should be covered with paint.IMPORTANT NOTES:
      6. Yellow and its adjacent hues can be used to create high-key muted color compositions. They cannot be darkened enough to reach low-key without losing saturation and becoming Chromatic Grays.
      7. Conversely, violet and its adjacent hues can not be lightened enough to reach the high-key value range without becoming Chromatic Grays.
      8. Violet, Blue and Green can be used to create low-key muted colors compositions.
    4. Prismatic Color Studies – Exercise #1:
      1. Make a 6×6″ gouache, painted-paper collage using at least six shapes. All colors should be PRISMATIC with a BROAD value range (light and dark) from a BROAD range of hues (colors). The entire surface of your paper should be covered with paint.
      2. Use scrap pieces of bristol to create your painted paper shapes. Cut these out with scissors or exacto knife.
      3. Arrange your shapes until you achieve a unified composition and then carefully glue down your pieces.
    5. Prismatic Color Studies – Exercise #2:
      1. Make second 6×6″ gouache, painted-paper collage using at least six shapes. All colors should be PRISMATIC with a NARROW value range (high or low key). This means you will either create a composition with prismatic yellows (high) or prismatic violets (low). The entire surface of your paper should be covered with paint.
      2. Use scrap pieces of bristol to create your painted paper shapes. Cut these out with scissors or exacto knife.
      3. Arrange your shapes until you achieve a unified composition and then carefully glue down your pieces.
      4. Make second 6×6″ gouache, painted-paper collage using at least six shapes. All colors should be chromatic gray with a NARROW value range (high, middle, or low key) from a broad range of hues (colors). The white paper is not considered a color – the entire surface should be covered with paint.
  3. Expression of Form, Emotions, or Concepts
    • Free-Study #1 – Combined Saturation
      • Break into groups of three and choose one word that is associated with either warm or cool color temperature.
      • Using your group’s box-o-scraps create a 9×12 or larger composition of your choice that demonstrates the concepts we covered in our Saturation Studies
        • Chromatic gray
        • Muted color
        • Prismatic color
        • Narrow Value (High-Key or Low-Key) or Broad Value
        • Temperature (warm and cool)
        • Cross-sensory metaphor
      • Explore how Saturation and Value can be used to show spatial depth: the TEXT element (your chosen word) is the focal point and should be emphasized through the use of saturation and value contrasts.
      • Your composition should also demonstrate a well-considered figure-ground relationship, unity, and economy.
      • Do not rely on white or black and fill the entire page with color.
      • If your composition is not complete by the end of the class, decide as a group how you will complete it.
    • Free-Study #2 – Ben Snead, Departures and Arrivals
      • You will be creating a Free-Study based on our field trip to see Ben Snead’s pubic subway mosaic work called Departures and Arrivals. While visiting Ben’s pubic subway mosaic work, Departures and Arrivals, answer the following in your CPB:

        1. What inspires Ben’s work?
        2. How does he use metaphor?
        3. What role does Symmetry and Pattern play in his work?
        4. Observe the hues, value, and saturation, what is the range of each?
        5. How would you describe the style of the work? What does it remind you of?
        6. Does the layering and position of the different birds, fish and insects have any significance?
        7. Is their any connection between the different species?
        8. Any other questions you have or observations you’ve made….

        After your visit READ these references to learn more:

      • In your CPB take some time to think about how you can use Departures and Arrivals as an inspiration for your own composition. Your composition should reference metaphor, balance, and the range of saturation (prismatic, muted and chromatic gray) demonstrated in the glass mosaic and ceramic tile artwork at the A Station at Jay Street-Borough Hall.
      • Create at least 10 quick sketches to “think” out some ideas. Remember to always consider the figure-ground relationship, economy, and unity.
      • Your final work should be a minimum of 11×17″ in any medium you like, but it should reference metaphor, balance, and the range of saturation (prismatic, muted and chromatic gray) observed in Ben’s glass mosaic and ceramic tile artwork at the A Station at Jay Street-Borough Hall.
  4. Thoughtful Assessment (verbal and written)
    • Critique
      • Bring all assignment parts to class, protected in a portfolio case or protective paper or cardboard envelope.
      • Be prepared to present, discuss and analyze your finished work in terms of concept, craft, what you learned, and creative process.
      • State the following: your name, what you are presenting (title and design problem), which parts are successful and why, which parts are unsuccessful and why
    • Written Assessment
      • In your Creative Process Book, at the end of the Assignment #4 section, document your thoughts about this project. Think about what you learned, what you could have done better (planning, material use, craft), and how you will apply what you learned to your next project.
  5. Work Hour Tally

    • In your Creative Process Book, outline the hours committed for each portion of the assignment, including dates and times.
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